With sincerest apologies to the American Kennel Club for satirizing their breed standards.

Breed: Glebe Terrier
Anglican Group of Breeds


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Table of Contents

General Appearance

Breeding

Related Breeds

Habitat

Temperament

What are Glebe Terriers REALLY?



General Appearance

The Glebe Terrier usually appears on microfilm although traditionalists among those who fancy this breed prefer paper or parchment originals. The Glebe Terrier is distinguished by its lack of legible handwriting in those areas which give the surnames of tenants on Glebe lands.


Breeding

This breed is rare due to difficulties in breeding. Breeding can be tricky as they prefer to whelp only during vestry meetings.


Related Breeds

Anglican Airedale, Episcopal Elkhound.


Habitat

Originally found in parish chests, most Glebe Terriers have since migrated to the shelves of Record Offices.


Temperament

Glebe Terriers are usually friendly to all.

When found in Record Offices, they do have difficulty getting along with other animals. Particularly, they seem to chase and bark at Rodent Control Officers and the occasional Archival water fowl.

In their original habitat, they were fond of lapping water directly out of the baptismal font.


What are Glebe Terriers REALLY?

A Glebe is land or other property held by or tithes due to a beneficed clergyman. The term Glebe Terriers is specific to the Church of England. Glebe Terriers are documents which list the Glebe property held by the individual parish.

These documents often mention the tenants of the Glebe lands and/or the holders of the adjoining lands. It is the naming of these other individuals which makes Glebe Terriers of genealogical value for researchers with English ancestry. Terriers may be found in County Record Offices nowadays. An excellent explanation of glebe terriers is provided by the Bedfordshire & Luton Archives & Records Service.



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Glebe Terrier
Created & maintained by Mark Howells.
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Updated September 25, 2005
Copyright © 1998-2005 by Mark Howells

Copyright © 1998-2005 by Mark Howells